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Emergency shut down in flight

Eagle's Eye Photo

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This is all IHMO, YMMV and I do not suggest anyone ever attempt this at home... Demonstrated on a closed road, with a professional driver... I am not responsible for any decapitations that may occur. :rolleyes:

When you attempt to hand catch any UAV, one thing you always want to do is keep your catching hand as high as possible with an upstreched arm, to provide as much clearance as you can. Specific to the Evo II you need to orient the aircraft while it is facing you, so that those props that are higher in the front, are the ones closest to you. It is counter-intuitive to be grabbing just behind the gimbal, but it is the safer choice. You want as much distance from those rear props as possible.

Every video I have seen on hand catching the Evo II shows that you want the aircraft to gently drop into your hand. Barely grab it in one hand, engage both sticks inward to kill the motors. (It really helps if you have a neck strap, so you can only concentrate on the sticks and not holding the controller, as well.)

Any movement of the aircraft while holding, will cause the motors to spin back up, as the IMU senses that movement and knows the Evo II is not on Terra Firma. Finally, if the aircraft is fighting you... rather than risk injury to yourself or others... LET GO, gain some height and re-assess your options.

It also would be awful that I might suggest, that if this to be attempted... that one practice this in non-emergency situations, so that when it is necessary... panic and lack of previous practice do not increase the personal risk to yourself.
 
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MattMPA

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Older thread, but it came up when I was searching for an emergency shutdown of my Evo Pro. I was flying around my house, lots of trees everywhere, so it was a very careful flight, in/out/around the trees, never more than about 30' off the ground.

I couldn't land (dogs were going to grab it) so I flew it up to where I could reach up and grab it. When I had hold of it, I pulled the left rudder full down, expecting it to turn the props off. That didn't happen. The drone went crazy and with full power on, it would have headed straight into the trees for a dreadful crash.

I tried everything to get it to stop, but nothing worked. I tried to pull the battery out but all I managed to do was to cut my fingers on the spinning props. Yes, I'm bleeding like a stuck pig.

I finally stuck it into some shrubs to get it to stop.

So yes, and emergency shutdown would have been very useful.
What a crazy thing! I've hand-caught mine a couple times, like my Mini. I have since decided it's better that I don't do this.

When I did...I simply put my hand underneath....and held the stick down. It shut off. I think trying to hold it against it's trying to fly would make it pull very hard...
 
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RedDragon

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A quick option to stop the motors is also useful for landing on moving or unstable platforms (e.g. boat, flatbed truck). My DJI Matrice 600 pro uses left stick down and in and power button to kill the props instead of waiting 3 seconds with left stick down. This was critical in being able to land on a small boat for research. I'm now trying to do this with Evo II and will be trying to kill the props mid flight to drop into a net or during hand catch (motorcycle gloves recommended for hand catching!).
 

uas_gian

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A rare but quite similar situation happened to us using the Evo II pro.

On the first low battery warning the aircraft was under a roof over water doing a slow sideways fly through of a structure. At 30% the low battery alarm sounded, so the plan was to finish the move and land on pavement. That seemed safer than flying all the way back. What I didn't know, was that someone else had set the critical low level to 25% where I usually have it at 15%. So before the drone was clear to land or gain altitude the RTH function unexpectedly kicked-in. when i realised it wanted to go up into the roof, i could press down to keep it hovering only.

Overwhelmed by the unexpected behaviour and with no other options to think of an assistant could get to the hovering drone and carefully grab it by the belly (without cutting his fingers) but when pressing the power button on the battery didn't turn off the aircraft as expected he became a hero. Power down manually must at least be possible at all times. The result was, he walked away pulling the resisting drone over his head to an open space. where I could reset the home point and let it finish it's RTH. To my opinion an emergency power down should be both possible manually on the aircraft and also remotely on the RC by pressing 3 designated buttons for 3 seconds you normally will never combine.

E.g. home, pause and auto-take-off all together could initialise the engine stop and the confirmation of this after audio signal to execute it in mid air is then done by both sticks inward, this procedure should be auto canceled by any move or button other than both sticks inward In case you really accidentally pressed those buttons simultaneously or in case the emergency was a false alarm. This procedure could easily be achieved by left and right handed pilots.

PS: A parachute option as customised attachment is mandatory in some cases in Europe to get clearance for some drone operations. For a parachute deployment also the mid air engine stop should be made possible.

The Evo II offers a novice mode from the box but is still missing that advanced pro mode. We are pro users we make movies, we have a good insurance, pilots should get pro features when pilots know what the risks are.
 

RedDragon

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For future situations like this, your catcher could simply flip the drone past 90 degrees vertical. That is, point the nose of the drone straight toward the ground. It will fight the move, but will immediately shut down the motors once past 90 degrees. The drone doesn't pull too hard even at full power and we were able to keep a grip on it fairly easily. We had to do this when hand caching on a moving, rocking boat as waiting multiple seconds with left stick down was not consistently shutting down the motors. A kill command would be much safer, but someone with a reasonably strong grip should have no problem with this. We wore helmets with face shields and leather gloves to prevent injury.
 
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uas_gian

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For future situations like this, your catcher could simply flip the drone past 90 degrees vertical. That is, point the nose of the drone straight toward the ground. It will fight the move, but will immediately shut down the motors once past 90 degrees. The drone doesn't pull too hard even at full power and we were able to keep a grip on it fairly easily. We had to do this when hand caching on a moving, rocking boat as waiting multiple seconds with left stick down was not consistently shutting down the motors. A kill command would be much safer, but someone with a reasonably strong grip should have no problem with this. We wore helmets with face shields and leather gloves to prevent injury.
Is this also working on the Autel drones? So far I have found news about the 90 degree angle to stop rotors only to be a DJI feature. I hope to never have to apply it, but sure will try this option should we ever again have to hand catch our Evo II. Or should we get some motorcycle gloves in order to teach everyone on our team how to do it :cool:
 

RedDragon

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Is this also working on the Autel drones? So far I have found news about the 90 degree angle to stop rotors only to be a DJI feature. I hope to never have to apply it, but sure will try this option should we ever again have to hand catch our Evo II. Or should we get some motorcycle gloves in order to teach everyone on our team how to do it :cool:
I can confirm that this works for the EVO II 8k. Haven't tried with other products. We used the method regularly (10+ times per day) during field sampling. And, yes, the motorcycle gloves may seem like overkill, but they do make you look pretty rad. With the safety helmet, it all ends up looking a bit Mad Max.
 

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