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Quick check to make sure rotor are solidly attached

Ken Ramsley

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I'm a seasonal flyer -- which means that I forget (almost) everything about my EVO once a year and need to relearn basic functions and service the drone almost like a newbie. As an office safety measure during this process, I sometimes pull the rotors. I'm 99% sure I've replaced them correctly, but I want 100% -- and when I saw an easy way to confirm a solid rotor connection, I made a quick video for future reference...


I made a similar video a while ago digging deeper into how a rotor is mounted (Autel's videos are somewhat incomplete) -- once again to have that 100% correct feeling...

 

gschulzuio

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Good info, another quick and easy thing to do is before you take off, do a short power up to just below lift off, couple of revs, if by chance something came loose since checking, you would find out before lifting off. Something easy to do especially if you do rocket take offs.
 

Ken Ramsley

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Good info, another quick and easy thing to do is before you take off, do a short power up to just below lift off, couple of revs, if by chance something came loose since checking, you would find out before lifting off. Something easy to do especially if you do rocket take offs.
I agree. In fact, after making and uploading the more recent of the two demo videos, I must have left something 'half-demo'd' and -hah- a rotor disappeared on take-off just minutes ago, and the drone flipped onto its back. I was launching from a soft surface, so no harm was done -- but it shows that testing adds its own sorts of risk, and very likely the best integrity test is the last flight where nothing went wrong.
 
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gschulzuio

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I agree. In fact, after making and uploading the more recent of the two demo videos, I must have left something 'half-demo'd' and -hah- a rotor disappeared on take-off just minutes ago, and the drone flipped onto its back. I was launching from a soft surface, so no harm was done -- but it shows that testing adds its own sorts of risk, and very likely the best integrity test is the last flight where nothing went wrong.
Its a lot less embarrassing having a prop fly off during "runup" then during takeoff ;)
 
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Ken Ramsley

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Its a lot less embarrassing having a prop fly off during "runup" then during takeoff ;)
I usually power the rotors, look for warning messages, and launch with the 'take-off' button. I then hover briefly at 5-6 feet to make sure the flight is stable, slowly rise another 20 feet letting the downward-facing camera(s) find a solid visual lock -- then it's onto my flight. If a rotor is ready to fall off, I suppose by then it will have fallen off.
 
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gschulzuio

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I usually power the rotors, look for warning messages, and launch with the 'take-off' button. I then hover briefly at 5-6 feet to make sure the flight is stable, slowly rise another 20 feet letting the downward-facing camera(s) find a solid visual lock -- then it's onto my flight. If a rotor is ready to fall off, I suppose by then it will have fallen off.
Yup, I do similar, brief run up before takeoff, usually take off manual with sticks unless doing an automated flight. Hover about 5-15 feet, check controls, check settings, then off to do what ever. Easier and quicker to do a quick land, reset, change, what ever then getting up and away and having to come back.
 
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