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Is there a way to set ISO, Shutter speed, AND EV manually?

Apollo11capcom

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I notice that when I set the camera or video to manual mode it opens ISO and shutter speed for adjustment but locks out access to exposure value. If I set the camera or video to auto mode it opens exposure value for adjustment but locks out ISO and shutter speed. Is there some setting I can use that would allow me to use/adjust all 3 manually? If not, what's the thinking behind doing it this way, anyone know?
 

jmbsmt63

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I notice that when I set the camera or video to manual mode it opens ISO and shutter speed for adjustment but locks out access to exposure value. If I set the camera or video to auto mode it opens exposure value for adjustment but locks out ISO and shutter speed. Is there some setting I can use that would allow me to use/adjust all 3 manually? If not, what's the thinking behind doing it this way, anyone know?
When going to "manual" the EV then is only a kind of exposure reading that tells you how over/under exposed you are at the current settings you have selected. So, as you discovered, it can't be adjusted along with the other 2 settings while in manual, just monitored.
That is normal operation.
My last 3 drones did that same thing.
It is like the "shutter priority" mode in a higher end camera.
Changing EV will change the other 2 settings so that is available in automatic but further "fine tuning" is only made by jumping to the manual menu/adjustments

I am not sure about this but something like the Mavic 2 Pro might be different because it has an adjustable aperture and that will increase your chance of getting the proper exposure if used in conjunction with the shutter/iso... so possibly the EV might do something on that drone to change the exposure instead of just a "meter"?

The thinking behind it is that you can use it to verify your settings without relying on what you see in the devices screen view.
 
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Apollo11capcom

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When going to "manual" the EV then is only a kind of exposure reading that tells you how over/under exposed you are at the current settings you have selected. So, as you discovered, it can't be adjusted along with the other 2 settings while in manual, just monitored.
That is normal operation.
My last 3 drones did that same thing.
It is like the "shutter priority" mode in a higher end camera.
Changing EV will change the other 2 settings so that is available in automatic but further "fine tuning" is only made by jumping to the manual menu/adjustments

I am not sure about this but something like the Mavic 2 Pro might be different because it has an adjustable aperture and that will increase your chance of getting the proper exposure if used in conjunction with the shutter/iso... so possibly the EV might do something on that drone to change the exposure instead of just a "meter"?

The thinking behind it is that you can use it to verify your settings without relying on what you see in the devices screen view.
Ok I'm following you I think... im trying to square this with what jcommstudios was saying in my video flickering thread, he said twice that ideally i want my exposure value twice my frame rate, so if im at 60fps my ev should be as close to 120 as possible... but looking at the ev settings I'm starting to wonder if he meant iso and not ev.

So with what youre saying, when adjusting iso and shutter speed, is 0 the target exposure value for any given picture?
 
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Agustine

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The 180-degree Shutter Rule states that whatever the framerate the shutter speed should be double. Therefore if you're shooting at 30fps, then you'll need a shutter speed of 1/60th; shoot at 60fps and your shutter speed should be 1/120th.
 

jmbsmt63

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Ok I'm following you I think... im trying to square this with what jcommstudios was saying in my video flickering thread, he said twice that ideally i want my exposure value twice my frame rate, so if im at 60fps my ev should be as close to 120 as possible... but looking at the ev settings I'm starting to wonder if he meant iso and not ev.

So with what youre saying, when adjusting iso and shutter speed, is 0 the target exposure value for any given picture?
Yes, Zero is the target. You can, of course, experiment with that depending on conditions ora particular "look" you want but yeah, zero is the goal.
A slower shutter speed will allow the camera sensor to receive more light by "holding" it open longer.
The rule of filming at a shutter speed of 2X the frame rate is very hard to achieve in a bright condition because if you slow the shutter down that much...it will wash out the exposure/brightness UNLESS you can control the aperture! THAT is where the ND filters come in. They will block the light so you can achieve that shutter speed.
All this is valid for filming.
Still images, however, require a faster shutter speed because of the "moving of the drone" (it is not on a tripod). A slower shutter speed will create a "smoothing" for example..like in a waterfall when you want that smooth look ...but if the drone is moving, even slightly in the wind,etc it will cause a less than sharp image with that slower speed. Again, a filter will allow that slower speed by not letting in all the light but then the capture will be susceptible to the motion of the drone.
 
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Apollo11capcom

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The 180-degree Shutter Rule states that whatever the framerate the shutter speed should be double. Therefore if you're shooting at 30fps, then you'll need a shutter speed of 1/60th; shoot at 60fps and your shutter speed should be 1/120th.
I could see why you wouldn't want a frame rate/ shutter speed mismatch, that is, if I'm thinking of this correctly.

So if im wanting to film a waterfall (which I will be doing soon) and i want to slow my shutter speed for effect, would it be 'correct' to keep the shutter speed divisible by the frame rate or is it not necessary? For example if im at 60fps, ss at 1/120th and I want to blur the falls i would go down to 1/60th, or..?
 

Apollo11capcom

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Yes, Zero is the target. You can, of course, experiment with that depending on conditions ora particular "look" you want but yeah, zero is the goal.
A slower shutter speed will allow the camera sensor to receive more light by "holding" it open longer.
The rule of filming at a shutter speed of 2X the frame rate is very hard to achieve in a bright condition because if you slow the shutter down that much...it will wash out the exposure/brightness UNLESS you can control the aperture! THAT is where the ND filters come in. They will block the light so you can achieve that shutter speed.
All this is valid for filming.
Still images, however, require a faster shutter speed because of the "moving of the drone" (it is not on a tripod). A slower shutter speed will create a "smoothing" for example..like in a waterfall when you want that smooth look ...but if the drone is moving, even slightly in the wind,etc it will cause a less than sharp image with that slower speed. Again, a filter will allow that slower speed by not letting in all the light but then the capture will be susceptible to the motion of the drone.
Ive got some experimenting to do... thanks for the advice. My filters just arrived today so now I'm just waiting on the weather and I can actually go out and try some of this!
 

jmbsmt63

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I could see why you wouldn't want a frame rate/ shutter speed mismatch, that is, if I'm thinking of this correctly.

So if im wanting to film a waterfall (which I will be doing soon) and i want to slow my shutter speed for effect, would it be 'correct' to keep the shutter speed divisible by the frame rate or is it not necessary? For example if im at 60fps, ss at 1/120th and I want to blur the falls i would go down to 1/60th, or..?
Exactly!
That is the general way to do that. A slower shutter speed induces more "blur" But you are correct in assuming that "doubling" rule is not set in stone, of course. It might take some trial and error to get that effect. It will be a fine line between the brightness/exposure being way off and that "effect" with the limited adjustments available to use with this camera.
At least you don't have to worry about the waterfall moving out of position while you review how your settings look...LoL
 
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